fbpx
To Hell & Back 41

To Hell & Back

Marcus Clark:

Yeah, hello.

Speaker 2:

Hi.

Estil Wallace:

Good evening, hello. So, my name is Estil, I’m CEO and Founder of Cornerstone Healing Center. This is Marcus.

Marcus Clark:

Hi, my name is Marcus. I’m the COO of Cornerstone Healing Center.

Estil Wallace:

So, this evening we’re going to run you through a bit of a journey. This journey is going to take you from… take you through what it’s like for an alcoholic/addict to go from the very beginning early stages and then, all the way up into long term recovery. Now, when we use words like addict or alcoholic, I think it’s good to point out we use those words interchangeably. When you start splitting hairs between substances, there are some medical difference, some biological differences obviously, the way they effect the human body. But other than that, the way the psyche works, the way recovery and addiction work, there’s really no difference between alcoholism and addiction per se. So, we lump them together, and because we talk about this stuff all the freaking time in one breath I’ll say alcoholism and in another breath we’ll say addiction, and we’re talking about the same thing. We’ll start with that.

Marcus Clark:

Yeah, make sense.

Estil Wallace:

All right, you want to get this party started?

Marcus Clark:

Yeah.

Estil Wallace:

FYI, I’ve been in recovery myself for 16 years. Marcus here is nine, almost 10?

Marcus Clark:

Yeah. 10 in March. I’ll be 10 years sober in March.

Estil Wallace:

Creeping up. March what?

Marcus Clark:

March 10th.

Estil Wallace:

I didn’t realize you were 10. I like that.

Marcus Clark:

[inaudible 00:01:38].

Estil Wallace:

Okay. Early years, the early years of drinking. But, there’s appropriate ages, I think, to be drinking. I suppose when you’re 21, and I think like in Europe I think you can drink when you’re 18.

Marcus Clark:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Estil Wallace:

But, I think that is pretty reasonable if you’re a young adult, maybe you’re in college. You’re not in your parent’s home anymore. Maybe you’re studying and all that sort of thing. I don’t think it’s that weird to drink, even a drink to impairment, maybe some beer pongs, keg stands, smoking some weed out of some bongs. That’s not that weird, right? It’s not that strange.

Marcus Clark:

The party goers.

Estil Wallace:

Yeah, the party drinks. Yeah, take some ecstasy, go dancing. Sounds cool. I don’t know if veterinarians go to raves or not, or if that’s even still a thing. All right, on this slide we talked about partying with friends. Consequences being limited or maybe none. The idea that life is long, and I’m just young, and I’m just kind of goofing off, just experimenting around. Maybe that your education is still on track or the beginnings of my career is on track. There’s nothing really to be concerned about.

Estil Wallace:

What’s weird about this phase is that alcoholic people, or people who are on the verge or the cusp of becoming full blown alcoholics or drug addicts, may be blending in to the normal crowd at this stage. It’s really tricky because people that are new to drinking, young people, they often drink irresponsibly. I don’t think it’s that strange to black out or to wake up with someone you don’t remember going to bed with. Or, to vomit when you’re 19, 20, 21 years old. It’s not that… You’re not some weirdo if you do that. A lot of people do that, I think, in that age range.

Estil Wallace:

So, the behavior is not as easily identifiable. Now, when you do that kind of stuff when you’re 30, like you probably [inaudible 00:03:35].

Marcus Clark:

Right.

Estil Wallace:

You have a real drinking problem. But when you’re 19, I mean, a lot of people drink and party, and there’s limited or no consequences. I mean, some people get heavy consequences when they’re young, but many don’t.

Marcus Clark:

Or even drinking after work, you know? Had a good day at work and I decided to take a couple beers, hang out with the friends, and at this stage for a lot of people it doesn’t seem any different, right? I might hang out with my friend and drink, and not know that that person might be having a different experience with the substance than me.

Estil Wallace:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Marcus Clark:

And that’s the key for me, like when I was using at that early age, and for a lot of us, when I was drinking at that early age, for me there was still a thing that I got from it that my friends didn’t necessarily get from it. And because we didn’t talk about it, right? We weren’t sitting there doing meth in a closet, you know?

Estil Wallace:

Are you smoking meth to escape, Marcus?

Marcus Clark:

Right, no one… There was never that question. I didn’t know that I was doing it, nor did they even think to ask me the reason that I drank. We all did it because it was socially acceptable. And I always talk about that too. I always talk about the social acceptability of drinking alcohol, right? I always give this example, right?

Marcus Clark:

So, if my friend Ryan is like, “Hey man, I quit smoking.” And everybody’s like, “Ryan! Dude! Great job. I am so glad that you quit smoking, phenomenal. That is the best feeling ever.” But at this stage, right, if my same friend Ryan came up to me and said, “I quit drinking.” I’d be like, “Uh, you okay?” Like no one’s congratulating somebody for not drinking because in our culture it’s acceptable to drink.

Estil Wallace:

It would be weird not to drink.

Marcus Clark:

It would be weird to not drink. More people ask the question that are getting sober-

Estil Wallace:

Why aren’t you drinking?

Marcus Clark:

Especially professionals.

Estil Wallace:

Are you okay?

Marcus Clark:

It’s like, what do I do when I go to a work party or a work event and someone asks me to drink? New people in recovery ask that question all the time.

Estil Wallace:

Yes, particularly a professional.

Marcus Clark:

Right. So, it’s like one of those things that at this point in your drinking career, at this point in your using career, you don’t feel any different, but you start to feel an effect. You feel something’s missing, something’s not okay, and I feel better when I do this and I’m thinking in my head, because we’re not having heart to heart conversations about all this stuff, because we don’t really know what’s going on, right? Neither party, I’m thinking in my head that they’re getting the same thing from this drink that I’m getting from this drink. I think everybody is experiencing the exact same experience that I’m experiencing because the only way I know how to experience life is through my own perspective.

Marcus Clark:

So, you don’t really know at this point that there is something that could possibly be going wrong. I’m just doing it to have a good time. We’re just having some beers, playing a little smash bros, you know? It’s what the boys do. Drinking a couple of little PBRs because I’m in college and I’m bored because I’m going to school to be a vet and I have no money now. Right? It’s just an enjoyable time and [crosstalk 00:06:47]-

Estil Wallace:

Absolutely.

Marcus Clark:

For even people, because at the end you see my career or education is on track. Even for career people, I go to work, I wake up on time. I do relatively well at my job, my friends don’t think anything’s wrong. I’m having a good time. Everything seems absolutely normal in my life. It’s like the precipice before the movie goes bad and everything’s beautiful. It’s like the storm-

Estil Wallace:

You’re like is something going to happen or what?

Marcus Clark:

Everything in my life is good-

Estil Wallace:

It’s fine. It’s probably going to be fine.

Marcus Clark:

Yeah.

Estil Wallace:

It’s fine. Next up is warning signs. So, this is where people in our lives start to make comments, like employers, friends, significant others, parents, teachers. People making comments, the type that make us uncomfortable. I begin to sense intuitively that something is wrong with me on a deeper level, like Marcus was just starting to describe. But I’m yet unable to clearly identify and articulate what is happening to me. I don’t really know. And I certainly haven’t thought it through well enough or gained enough experience from other people to be like, “Oh, maybe this is the early stages of alcoholism.” I’m just living my life, and deep down… And gosh, life throws so much as us anyway, so we’re talking about an array of stimulation’s.

Estil Wallace:

Maybe you’ve got a relationship you think isn’t working out. Maybe that’s part of what’s going on here. Maybe you’re just getting settled in a new town. Maybe you’ve just graduated, and now you’re moved to a new city and you’re making friends. There’s a million ways I could explain a way the consequences that are starting to appear in my life. There’s a million ways I can minimize and I can compartmentalize, and it’s not that it’s… because I’m sensing the canary in the coal mine, he’s not dead, but he’s coughing. The canary in the coal mine is not doing good, but I’m not convinced. I’m not really convinced that there’s anything that needs to be done.

Estil Wallace:

God, my parents are tough. They were like, “We’re really worried about you.” And I was like, “I don’t know what you’re worried about. I’m not crazy.” Anybody talk to you?

Marcus Clark:

No, I mean for me man, I’m in college and I’m living my life and I’m doing the things that I need to do. And my girlfriend starts to notice my using pickup. I didn’t notice it. I just want to have a good time, and a good time went from Friday night and Saturday night to Sunday, but it’s still Sunday and I can wake up and go to school. I’m going to go to class for sure. I’ve got this. And intuitively inside of me, like inside of my soul, I know that something might be amiss, but I can’t believe that it’s the thing that I’m doing that’s giving me some relief. I’ve got a lot of school. I’m having to work to make it through. I don’t have much money. All my friends are doing it still at this point, right? But they’re not doing it on Monday.

Marcus Clark:

But I don’t tell them I’m doing it on Monday, but they’re not doing it on Monday and I’m still able to blend in with the second level friends. The people who see me at school and people that hang out with me on the weekends. But anybody close to me can start to see something’s going on, but if they were to ask me what is it? Once again, like we talked about before, we don’t talk about that thing that I’m getting from this substance. That sense of ease and comfort when I put it in my body. When school’s just a little bit too hard, and I’ve got too many test or I got something going on in my life, or work’s a little bit too difficult, right?

Estil Wallace:

I just want to take the edge off.

Marcus Clark:

That’s it.

Estil Wallace:

That’s it, nothing big.

Marcus Clark:

And that’s what my friends say. You just taking the edge off.

Estil Wallace:

Taking the edge off.

Marcus Clark:

But my girlfriend’s like, “You’re taking the edge off a couple of too many times. How many edges do you have? Like you got too many edges here, buddy. Something is going on.” But the consequences are starting to happen. My grades go from A’s to C’s, a couple D’s. And I’m thinking it’s because I’m overworked. Let me explain it away. The reason my grades are bad is because of you know.

Estil Wallace:

You see, what had happened was.

Marcus Clark:

Right! The what had happened start, right? I start to explain it away with all these other things because I can’t let go of the one thing that I don’t know that’s causing it. But the one thing that’s giving me relief at this point.

Estil Wallace:

Yeah, because what we’re kind of starting to tip toe towards is fundamentally the core of addiction or alcoholism, and that is that it’s not really… A real substance problem has very little to do with substances. It has to do with living sober. I’m going to let that sink in. I know it’s semantical, but this is critical. Alcoholism has very little to do with alcohol, and has much more to do with living in the absence of alcohol or other drugs. See, that’s the problem. Alcohol is not the problem. Alcohol is what it is. Drugs are what they are. They’re inanimate, I mean they’re pharmacology, they’re substances. How do I respond or react when I put these substances in my body?

Estil Wallace:

The typical person, especially when you start getting past college age, doesn’t drink to impairment almost ever. We’re talking high 80th percentile. Most people do not drink to impairment beyond college years. It’s not a thing. So, if you find yourself drinking to impairment, getting behind the wheel of the car for example, you’ve got a serious problem. We work with people that get DUIs. Guess what they say? We do screenings, we do them on Zoom like this, right? We do a Zoom screening, and we ask them, how many times have you drank and drove in the past? And guess what they say? Almost every time they say, “This was my first time.” Eh! No!

Estil Wallace:

The chances of you having a drink, drinking to impairment and then getting in a car and then, the police actually finding you, pulling you over and writing you a citation for a DUI and getting arrested, the chances are almost better of winning the lottery. People who get DUIs are a pervasive, habitual, chronic drunk drivers. Just over, and over and over, and over because the chance of getting pulled over the first time you have a couple of beers and, how many drinks did you have? They always say the same thing. Two, I had two drinks.

Estil Wallace:

Bro, you had two drinks for breakfast. So, again, has very little to do with drugs and alcohol. Has a lot more to do with living sober. This is my favorite slide I think.

Marcus Clark:

Consequences are now piling up over the line.

Estil Wallace:

Yep. Over the line, consequences are piling up. You’ll see I chose a dumpster fire as the image. So, we go from like, “Eh, this might be a little sketchy” to “Aw man, we’re screwed.” And that’s because that’s how it happens. Now, as an outsider observing, if I’m watching Marcus in his college age years, he’s slipping into full blown addiction, I’m watching him go from, “Eh, this is kind of sketchy” to like, “This is getting worse. Hey man, you should probably get some help.” And eventually, I watch him become a dumpster fire. But for the person who’s experiencing it, for Marcus, everybody that ever said, “Hey man, why don’t you take it easy? Why don’t you drink less? Why don’t you not do these street drugs?” He’s probably saying, “Hey, I’ve got this. I’m cool.”

Estil Wallace:

And then, by the time Marcus is finally like, “Hey, this is crazy. I want to stop.” It’s like this. Dumpster fire. Over the line, consequences are piling up. Things are not good.

Marcus Clark:

Slow burn sometimes too. It can be a slow or a fast burn. And I want to say it clearly, over the line is different for everybody.

Estil Wallace:

It’s true.

Marcus Clark:

That stigmatism that the alcoholic, drug addict is the dude that’s laying on the street corner, the kid that’s laying in some house doing heroin is just not true. I mean, doctors, lawyers, basketball players, politicians, actors, friends, families, everyone. It doesn’t matter what you look like because these consequences look different for everybody.

Estil Wallace:

Yes.

Marcus Clark:

Depending on your lifestyle, depending on where you live, depending on how much money you make, it could look different and the amount of money isn’t what makes you an alcoholic or a drug addict because that misconception, a lot of the time, is what people think. I make too much money to be a drug addict.

Estil Wallace:

Yep.

Marcus Clark:

I got too many degrees to be a drug addict. I’ve went to school, I’ve accomplished all these things because it’s not that choice of willpower. It’s not, “Man, these things in my life are starting to happen that are bad.”

Estil Wallace:

It’s a disease.

Marcus Clark:

I’m going to change it today, right?

Estil Wallace:

It’s a disease, and having a bunch of money doesn’t determine whether or not you have a disease.

Marcus Clark:

You can have a billion dollars and get cancer.

Estil Wallace:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Dude, we have some rich people that have alcoholism. And if you look at some of the more famous celebrities you can point to. Look at Robin Williams. Look at Philip Seymour Hoffman. I really love that guy’s acting.

Marcus Clark:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Estil Wallace:

But it’s no surprise. That guy’s been shooting heroin for decades. So, it doesn’t matter how successful you are. So, those external things really aren’t the indicators, and obviously we have that other presentation where we really got into the nuts and bolts of stigma. But Marcus is right, having a barometer in our minds, which is made on false perceptions of what a drug addict may or may not look like isn’t a good safety net. It’s not a good measuring stick.

Estil Wallace:

I need to ask myself something simple, because listen, people that don’t struggle with drugs and alcohol, it’s not even a question. Doesn’t come up. Nobody says nothing to them about it. They don’t lay awake wondering about it. They don’t google search detoxes, they don’t google search. You know what I mean? It’s not an issue. It’s either an issue or it’s not. So, if it’s an issue, and I’m starting to, like on the bullets here, if I’m starting to flirt with the idea of change. “Man, I need to get out of this city. Maybe this city is messing me up. Maybe I need to get out of this relationship.”

Marcus Clark:

The question, what’s wrong with me? When I asked that question many years, and let’s make this 100% true because I did the misconceptions and judged what an alcoholic means or that it was. I wasn’t that, so thus, I don’t have a problem because I never looked at the inside. And that’s the one thing that cannot be measured externally. It’s what’s going inside of me? What’s going on inside of me?

Marcus Clark:

The first thing we do when we get a client is we do a bio-psycho-social. We look at all parts of the human. Every part, and I use the word human on purpose. I’m not using any other word. I’m using the word human because every person on this earth is a human. A drug addict is a human just like everybody else.

Estil Wallace:

And we don’t treat horses.

Marcus Clark:

Right, and we don’t treat horses. You guys treat horses, but I don’t think horses have drug addiction problems.

Estil Wallace:

If they do, let us know in the comments because I don’t know-

Marcus Clark:

We’ll start [inaudible 00:18:13] treatment center.

Estil Wallace:

Yes.

Marcus Clark:

But, I didn’t know at that point, right? I’d never… I started to ask myself the question, “What’s wrong with me?” And once again, I didn’t talk to anybody about what was going on inside, and I had already drawn this line in the sand about what an alcoholic and drug addict was. And that stigma, me thinking in my head because we all know what people say and think about drug addicts, right? Me thinking in my head that I don’t want to be that one thing that is bad, never gave myself to ask that question what’s truly wrong with me? And when I finally asked that question to myself, I didn’t look like all those things that I thought a drug addict was. So, what I pointed out and picked out was you know, I wonder if this relationship is messing me up? It’s my family. It’s this job. I need to start to get away from these things.

Marcus Clark:

And there’s this really tricky saying that you hear a lot, is no matter where I go, there I am. I don’t know that the problem is truly me, and these substances. And I use that terminology and you’ll hear Estil talk about that terminology, right? Because the problem centers in me. Right? I use these external substance to treat this condition that’s inside of me, that I can’t explain, that I don’t talk to, I don’t understand it, I don’t have anybody that understands it because of the stigma that’s attached to it that I put in my mind, and not the stigma that other people have, right?

Marcus Clark:

Once again, I quit drinking, you’re going to be like, “What’s wrong with you Marcus?”

Estil Wallace:

It’s cancel culture, baby. I don’t want to get canceled.

Marcus Clark:

Right.

Estil Wallace:

There’s about a million people per year in the United States that do not go to treatment for one reason or another, and 40% of those people, about 400,000 people every year in America do not go to treatment because of stigma, because they’re afraid of so many things.

Marcus Clark:

100%.

Estil Wallace:

Cancel culture before it was cool.

Marcus Clark:

And I start to look at that idea of change, right? So, I start to change. I move, I get a different job. Maybe I get into a different relationship with a different partner. Maybe I start to exercise and workout, but in all of these times-

Estil Wallace:

That should do it. If you get in really good shape, you should be able to manage your drinking.

Marcus Clark:

Oh, you’d be fine, because I used these external things to try to fix my internal condition, right? And then, eventually the problem continues to happen. I pick up bouts of sobriety. I stop for periods of time. I have maybe kids, I get married. I start to have these big life things that I’m going to tell myself this time it’s going to be different. I’ll wake up early and I’ll run it away, or I’ll out work it, because I’ve developed this mentality of work. If I have a problem, I just out work it. If I spend more hours at work, if I do more things, then I won’t want to put this substance in my body.

Marcus Clark:

And I do such a good job with those things. I go to work and I do so phenomenal at work. I do everything at home. But then, there’s still this lurking notion, there’s still this thing in the back of my mind and all of a sudden, I’m doing the thing that I know isn’t right. But when I do the thing, I feel better than when I do all of those other things combined. That one thing, it’s like I’m at the bottom of a pool and I can’t breathe, and I’m fighting and I’m fighting and I’m fighting, and I’m fighting, and I’m fighting to get air and I can’t breathe. What will I do to breathe? Anything.

Marcus Clark:

Sorry mom, sorry dad, sorry career, sorry friends, sorry [crosstalk 00:21:52], sorry kids. And I love you, but when I wake up in the morning it feels like I’m trapped at the bottom of a pool. I’ve done everything everyone’s told me externally to fix this problem. And now at this point, right, when do you think we get most of our referrals? Late at night.

Marcus Clark:

Now, one night, I’m sitting online, and I start google searching. Treatment, alcohol, detox, right? And this-

Estil Wallace:

How do I detox myself from prescription drugs?

Marcus Clark:

Oh, that’s one of the biggest things that people look up. Prescription drugs, I’m using prescription drugs and they’re cool because the doctor gave them to me.

Estil Wallace:

Yeah, I’m not a drug addict. I have a prescription for these. Well, I did and now I’ve been writing my own prescriptions.

Estil Wallace:

This part of the journey where I know that this is hard. I now have a pretty good understanding that I’m hardwired for self destruction and that the pin has been pulled from this hand grenade, and that it’s not going to get better. But I’m not… I don’t know what I’m supposed to do to get better. This portion where I start to flirt with the idea of change, it can last years. This part of the three ring circus can last for a long time. This isn’t like things got out of hand, trip leads over to treatment. That’s not usually how it goes down.

Marcus Clark:

No one looks that first day. That day I talked about when I’m online searching. Most people don’t check in that first time. I could look that first time five years before I ever check in to treatment.

Estil Wallace:

And that’s the way it goes. There’s often many, many attempts at recovery before it finally clicks. You want to do more on this or you want to keep going?

Marcus Clark:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Estil Wallace:

Transformation. So, what happens when somebody actually gets sober? Because I think for a lot of people who may not be familiar with the recovery process, it may seem a little black box. But I want to tell you a couple of things that you may or may not know. So, first and foremost, per the Cochran Report, they used to say there was… Ryan and I were just talking about this before this presentation. They used to say back in 2006 and earlier that recovery rates for addiction were single digit. And in treatment centers they would preach this nonsense and they would say, “Out of 100 of you, only six of you guys are going to make it” or whatever.

Estil Wallace:

And I’ve got to tell you this was not true. So, what they discovered in the most recent Cochran Report, which was just released a little less than a year ago, is that just by walking into the halls of a 12 step program your chance of staying sober, not for a year, permanently for the rest of your life are between 22 and 37%. And if you stack treatment, sober living, and a structured recovery environment for 12 to 18 months, so you really check in to recovery, right? You make this a way of life for 12 to 18 months, your chance of staying sober permanently are over 65%.

Estil Wallace:

So you should know that amongst chronic illnesses, which this is categorized as, in fact it’s the third leading cause of death of Americans. And if you’re under 50, it’s the leading cause of death. So, this effects everyone, and the treatment is super effective. And it’s repeatable! We’re not doing some… Listen, this isn’t some drink some Iowaska and we’re going to see if we can’t cleanse the spirit and see if it works and cross our fingers. It’s a repeatable process. We’ve been doing this for 80 years with really strong success.

Estil Wallace:

So, it’s not rocket science, and it’s not voodoo. It’s pretty simple. The new way of life that’s been outlined has some components to it, and I think everyone’s version of recovery can look a little different. There’s nuance, but if I want to kind of go through what does it look like in general. So, starting a new life in recovery looks like 12 step recovery, accountability, so it means meetings. Working with a sponsor. Daily meditation, sponsorship, prayer. I would even go as far as to say that word. Some people are totally cool with the word prayer. They may have religious experience or background. Some people are agnostic, some people are atheist, some people just don’t know and really don’t want to have anything to do with God or church or anything like that. And that’s totally fine. That’s the person I am.

Estil Wallace:

I got sober violently anti religious. I didn’t like the word God. I didn’t like the word fellowship. I didn’t like anything that sounded church-y. So, that’s really no barrier to recovery. I thought it was, and it really isn’t. Once you get into this world, there’s a lot of different stuff that goes on. But the primary meat of the steps is clearing away resentments, fear and self defeating behaviors. Once we clear that stuff up, we go out and we try to help people.

Estil Wallace:

And it’s not like going on a mission where you go out here, we fly to Haiti and feed people or something. You just do your best on a daily basis to contribute rather than take from the world around you. It’s pretty simple, and it’s actually quite… We’re getting such a high level. If you find yourself struggling and you get in to this world, it’s actually quite tactical and it’s quite reasonable. There’s a very practical application on how to do this specifically. This is kind of the high level.

Estil Wallace:

And when the transformation, when it really hits the tipping point and I start to really analyze my entire life and all the things that have led me through self destruction to this point of surrender where I’m broken, when I’m in the dumpster fire and I’m like, “God, I just need a new way to live my life.” And I go through this self analysis, I do this inventory and I clear away these self defeating beliefs and resentments, there’s this moment that’s a lot like you guys ever see the Sixth Sense? Where at the end, what’s his name? Bruce Willis, realizes he’s been dead the whole time. He’s like the ghost. It’s like in [inaudible 00:28:09] movie. It’s like, “Wait a minute. This was all my fault the whole time? I was the bad guy the whole freaking time?”

Estil Wallace:

And that’s a recurring theme for people that find permanent endurable recovery is that they discover through the transformation process that much of this has been self imposed. Much of it, not all. Listen, violent crime’s a real thing. Natural disasters are a real thing. But if you subtract those, pretty much everything else that’s gone wrong in your life… What else is there?

Marcus Clark:

Yeah.

Estil Wallace:

Everything else is interpersonal relationships, including the one with myself and most of mine were pretty rotten for a long time. And, while it was easy to point the finger and cast blame, when I had a hard look at it, my response to the world around me was… That’s what I have control over. That’s what I could shift.

Estil Wallace:

See, there’s a definite and significant benefit to being the victim, and letting the actions and injustices of the world be to blame for my demise, for my dysfunction, for my failure. And that benefit is that it’s not my fault. It’s not my fault, I didn’t do this. The trouble with that is that there’s no way out. When I’m the victim and I don’t have any power, there’s no way out of that. The flip side, if I can accept this idea that maybe much of this has actually been caused by me and me alone, what it does is it opens up the possibility. It opens up the doorway that things could be different because I have control over my actions and my words.

Estil Wallace:

I control what I do and what I say. With a little practice, I can get better at it. A little direction, I can do it in a much healthier way. And, when I realize that that doorway can actually be opened, my behavior can change, the things I say to people can change, all of a sudden there’s a way out. And I don’t have to… What if I’m not the victim? What if I’m the perpetrator?

Marcus Clark:

Eventually.

Estil Wallace:

If I’m the perpetrator of all these crimes, first of all that’s a horrible thing to realize. But it’s the freaking way out, man. That’s the way out. I realize all of a sudden like, dude, if I’m the villain, how about if I just quit being the villain? How about if I just try being kind to people? Maybe this is a tough pill to swallow for some people. How about if I try being kind to myself?

Marcus Clark:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Estil Wallace:

Stop being so freaking hard on myself all the time.

Marcus Clark:

And I want to… And I think Estil is going to go a little bit in his personal story after this and then, I’ll go a little bit in my personal story after this. I want to say, the hope and the understanding of this presentation is so you can understand a little bit if you’re struggling or if you know people that are struggling that you can identify, or be able to relate to someone that’s going through something. And I want to say, a lot of times this transformation stage, a lot of it isn’t like I’m trying to do this to myself. At the end of the day, like he said, he uses the [inaudible 00:31:17] reference, right? Because you don’t know, right?

Marcus Clark:

Because bad things happened to me personally as a kid, right? But I carried for years, and eventually I became the person repeating the actions that happened to me to myself.

Estil Wallace:

Yep.

Marcus Clark:

Right? And what this really is, is it’s a power of empower. It’s a journey of empowerment. Right? How do I find some type of power? How do I find the ability to look at myself? And for me, for the longest time, it was an inability to be vulnerable with anyone on a real level. I looked nice and people liked me, and I’ve always had a good enough, I think, good enough personality. I hope, right? A good enough personality to make friends and I’ve done decently well. And there’s been times where I didn’t do decently well, right?

Marcus Clark:

And I lived this life with these feelings that I thought probably most people have. They must feel like I feel because I experience life through my lens. And if they don’t feel these, that’s a bigger fear because now I’m different. And no one wants to be different than their… Not really. Like I like different music. I’m a hipster, so I like to listen to bands no one’s ever heard of. But that’s cool because I’m different, but there’s a whole group of different people like me, right? We drink Kombucha, I love it. I wear Toms, they’re great. I love journaling because I’m a really good person. But I live this life, right? And for me, it was always this thing that I felt that was something else was going on and I didn’t think that there was anyone who understood the way that I felt.

Marcus Clark:

I really didn’t believe that because I was afraid to let you in because if I let you in you won’t like me because deep down inside I don’t like myself because no one does what we do that loves themself, right? And I never wanted to admit that to myself that I didn’t really love myself at that time because people don’t love people that do the things that I do. People don’t love addicts, and people don’t love alcoholics, or at least that’s what the world made me believe, right?

Marcus Clark:

And when I got to a position when people come in and they get to this position to where they’re… It takes a certain level of pain to pick up the phone and call someone you’ve never met. And think about that though.

Estil Wallace:

And place your life on reserve and leave it in their hands-

Marcus Clark:

No, but even more, think about that. If someone is more willing to call a random number than tell someone they know. Think about that. And that’s the way that it was for me. I would rather tell anyone but my family. I would rather tell anyone but the people that love me, and if I tell the people that love me, I only want to tell a few. But if it’s really, really bad and you’ve seen me messing up for a long time, and everybody finds out, I kind of just live in that world anyway, right? I’m that guy that does those things, right?

Marcus Clark:

My family knows these things about me, and they’re probably getting tired of me because you have the two levels. The sneaky, I’m not going to tell you what’s going on. And then, all of a sudden I need to get sober, and then everyone watches the slow burn dumpster fire turned into my life, turned into pitiful, incomprehensible, demoralization and I don’t know what to do. And then, I step into a place where people know exactly the way I feel. They’re not looking at my accolades. They’re not looking at my resume. And they don’t care how much money I make, and they don’t care what I look like.

Marcus Clark:

They accept me the way I am. And I learned through that process, right, of going to meetings and building comradery and meditation, self, learning self, learning how to take care of myself, learning what I even really liked. What do I really like? A lot of this change, I wasn’t a hipster when I got sober. Sobriety did this to me and it sucks. I’m kind of mad about it. I wish I wasn’t a hipster-

Estil Wallace:

Hey, you know what sucks?

Marcus Clark:

What?

Estil Wallace:

Kombucha.

Marcus Clark:

Kombucha is amazing.

Estil Wallace:

Uh, so gross.

Marcus Clark:

But I learned through this process of redemption, and I like to use the word redemption because I learned through this process of redemption that I have the power to change. I can’t change the world. I just can’t. I can move, but it won’t change. I need to get away from some bad relationships, that’s true. But I can’t change everybody in the world-

Estil Wallace:

Why did you get in these bad relationships, Marcus?

Marcus Clark:

I don’t know. It just happened.

Estil Wallace:

You just get with the wrong girls all the time.

Marcus Clark:

I don’t know.

Estil Wallace:

How do [crosstalk 00:35:52] find you?

Marcus Clark:

But through that process, right, of learning myself and being present, I get this new feeling. And I always say this to people, right? I’m 35 now, I got sober when I was 25 and I always tell this to people. I live 25 years of life before I ever lived one day, ever. And I went to college and I made money, and I had a good life in a lot of ways. But I never felt it the way that I feel it now, ever. And now, I know how the people that I looked at felt, but in that period when you feel so different than everyone around you, you feel alone. So, what do we do? We look for people who feel like we feel and we hang out with people who do what we do. So, I don’t have to feel so alone.

Marcus Clark:

And when I came into this program and I came into these rooms, and I learned that other people were suffering the way that I was suffering, and they had found a solution. And that was solution was the thing that I could grasp on with them. We were all different, but we all have that common solution. And through that process I learned to live life, and I’m not talking about a life of money and cars and clothes and all those things. But a life that I actually could feel and I could wake up happy every day. It didn’t matter about the external, and I didn’t need to work it all away, and I didn’t need to work it away, and I didn’t need to continuously try to run from myself.

Marcus Clark:

That’s what’s beautiful about meditation is I learned to be able to sit with myself. Then, the beautiful thing with sponsorship is I learned to help people who have been in the same place that I’ve been. And that is the beauty of this transformation is like once you learn that I have the ability to change the way that I feel through a set pattern of actions, and I repeat that pattern of actions over and over again and I get the results. That’s the beautiful thing about the things that we get to do, and I just want people to know that this can change, and it is able to be… People are redeemable. Regardless of what they done and probably felt, no one is alone. There are people that understand, you know? And just get rid of that stigma.

Marcus Clark:

If somebody tells you they need to talk and we listen, and that’s the best thing you can do for somebody. The first person that actually listened to me and didn’t give me that weird look of like, “I have no idea what’s wrong with you.” And they were just like, “Hey man, I’ll help you.” And that was one of the best feelings that I ever got is when somebody reached out their hand and was willing to listen, even if they didn’t necessarily understand. But they were willing to help. And I think it’s our job to continue to go out there and help people understand that addiction and alcoholism is not a symptom of being a weak person, or a different person. It’s a mental health disease that people suffer from and it is 100% treatable.

Estil Wallace:

15 to 20% of Americans suffer from it. So, it’s two out of 10.

Marcus Clark:

[inaudible 00:38:53].

Estil Wallace:

I drank as a kid. I was an early starter, so for me, I got sober pretty young. Unlike Marcus, I’d never been to college, I’d never made any money to speak of, I’d never really done anything of any note. So, I check in the facility, and everything that they laid on me, which we’ve kind of outlined some of it here, but it was meetings, it was sponsorship, it was having a service commitment. These things, these disciplines, what I didn’t know at the time… Those of you that remember The Karate Kid from the 80s. What they were doing is they were Mr. Miyagi-ing me.

Estil Wallace:

I’m over here, wax on, wax off. And what they’re really doing is teaching me kung fu. They had me getting up early. I’m eating, I’m going to work. I’m doing 12 step meetings. I’m working steps with my sponsor. Going to bed on time. Right? I’m learning to pray to a God I don’t believe in. I’m spending time in meditation even though I think it’s weird and stupid. I’m writing down really uncomfortable, vulnerable stuff during inventory in the middle of the step work. And I’m going to these 12 step meetings, and I’m talking to strangers.

Estil Wallace:

And, what I don’t realize is that while I’m working on myself, self examination, all this stuff; time is starting to pile up where not only am I not drinking or using, but I get up early and I meditate and I exercise. And I’m being honest with other people about what’s really happening between my ears today in this moment. I’m learning how to be present, and over the course of five, six months, all of a sudden something hit me. I don’t feel like drinking anymore. I had what we describe in the recovery world as a psychic change or spiritual awakening, if you will, where the person I imagine I could be or I wish I could be starts to look a lot like the person I am.

Estil Wallace:

And when that starts to happen, I start to find resolve. I find confidence. Not [inaudible 00:41:13] sureness, not fake confidence. Like, balls to bones, I become like me. Authentically, unapologetically me. I don’t owe anybody anything and I’m not ashamed. I’m not better than. Recovery made me right sized. For a long time I was either too good, or not good enough, depending on who I was standing next to. Right? And recovery helped me find a way to just be me. Just be myself.

Estil Wallace:

And by the way, it’s really hard to be me right now because I swear, I curse like a filthy sailor. I’m really trying hard. I know not to say any swear words. But, in being honest and authentic, I found that by honoring myself I could develop a relationship with myself. I couldn’t stay sober because I hated myself, and I hated… In sobriety, I felt that acutely. The sting of that is so intense if I don’t have any substances in my body. And I don’t remember it starting that way. I just liked to drink man, and it got away from me.

Estil Wallace:

It’s just as simple as that. And you flash forward into this transformation period, and I was not struck sober overnight. I was physically sober for many months and while in the healing process, going through the steps, living in a facility, doing all this uncomfortable work I had a moment where I woke up. I didn’t wake up, I was riding the bus actually. But I had a moment and I was wearing donated clothing that I picked out a donation bin. I was making very little, minimum wage at the time, 2004 the minimum wage was $8 an hour. And I rode the bus everywhere, I smoked cigarettes back then. Not that there’s… I don’t smoke anymore. I don’t use nicotine anymore.

Estil Wallace:

But, I learned how to transmit the message that had been given to me to other men. I was in early stages of sponsorships where I was learning to sponsor other men. And, I was riding the city bus back home after working with some guys, and I felt it. It washed over me. It felt like this woo. The tumor like ghost, this cancerous apparition that had wrapped itself around my freaking life and around my soul, and around my every thought and around all my relationships and just rotted things that I touched from the inside out for so long; in that moment, it vanished. And it’s never come back.

Estil Wallace:

It’s been 16 years. That happened in December of 2004. It’s never come back, and all kinds of life has happened. And that’s sort of what the next slide is about.

Marcus Clark:

Oh yeah.

Estil Wallace:

Yeah, the long haul. Long term, durable recovery and I like the term durable recovery. So, for example, let’s talk about, I think this is good segue for things like harm reduction, for example. Harm reduction methods of recovery would be considered like methadone or long term suboxone use. Wonderful substances. I’m a big fan of harm reduction. I think done appropriately these are life saving instruments. These do not, and I want to be clear, these do not represent long term durable recovery. They’re instruments to get somebody over a seemingly impossible threshold, right?

Estil Wallace:

But when I say durable recovery, I mean while I could be abstinent and I can not only be abstinent, I can feel fine about being abstinent when life happens. When people close to me die, when my income quadruples and I grow up and I get married, and I have kids and life becomes life. And I enter into… As an already grown person, I really become a more responsible adult because that’s going to happen. As a natural byproduct of becoming responsible for myself, my past, my transgressions, the people I owe and I started to get involved in self care and I really recover. If I’m not trapped, right? If I’m not trapped smoking speed in a bathroom, or I’m not trapped in a bar telling strangers my woes; free to live my life. It turns out I’m interested in a lot of things.

Estil Wallace:

So, while I’m out there living my life, things are going to happen, both positive and negative in my perception. Some big, some small, and through all those things, I need a way to live that enables me to stay sober and happy about it the whole way through. So, when we talk about durable recovery, that’s what we’re talking about. Long term, durable recovery. The real thing. Not, “Ah, I fell off the wagon.” There’s no wagon. I’m not on any wagon.

Estil Wallace:

I found a relationship with the power to center the universe, which helped me straighten out my relationship with myself, my relationship with my fellows. And live a rock and roll life, man. It’s awesome. I don’t know, there’s no wagon. I’m not waiting for some other shoe to drop. I’m not waiting for some external circumstance to change and blow me off of this thing. Internally I’ve been completely reorganized. And the way we continue to maintain that, and not just maintain it but grow it, and develop it over time is to continue to attend groups.

Estil Wallace:

And it’s not always 12 step necessarily. So, I don’t want to be like, “Oh, you’ve got [inaudible 00:47:28].” We highly suggest 12 step, engagement, but accountability groups could be beyond 12 step worlds. There’s all types of those steel on steel groups. There’s all kinds of stuff. But, being accountable with your peers, being… And when I say accountable, like, “Hey, this is what I’m struggling with.” And then, next week you can be like, “Hey, you were really struggling last week. What’s going on this week?” Accountability, like real accountability.

Estil Wallace:

Daily meditation and prayer. Rigorous honesty. Self awareness and self improvement. And this goes as far as the, what do they say in the 12 step world? How free do you want to be? How free do you want to be? So, when I talk about self awareness and self improvement, I mean, where does that end? I don’t know. I don’t know where it ends. I was a couple years sober hanging out with a bunch of guys that had double digit sobriety and they were all morbidly obese. And I had another ah-ha moment. I was like, “Man, I want to stay sober, but I don’t know if I want to be 300 pounds. Maybe I should look outside of this fellowship and do some other fellowships.” And I’ve got wrapped up in fitness and gym culture.

Estil Wallace:

And I’m a huge proponent of therapy. There’s so many things when you start opening the universe of self awareness and self improvement, there’s so many things out there. So many fascinating things to get wrapped up in, and swept away with. And it’s just instead of dying in my home drinking myself to death, I can live rich, a rich meaningful life. Whatever that means to me. It doesn’t have to be what anybody else thinks. But my own standards, what I think is rich and meaningful. What brings a tear to my eye, what chokes me up when I think about it? For me, that’s being with my wife and raising my kids, and running this treatment center and traveling the world, you know? And work with drug addicts.

Estil Wallace:

For me, that’s it. The sun rises and sets with this.

Marcus Clark:

And I think that’s… And I’ll saying something about that. I think that, to me, is one of the most beautiful things that we get to do. And when we sit here in this conference room that you’re sitting in right now, right, that the computer’s sitting in that you’re seeing-

Estil Wallace:

I feel like they’re sitting here with us.

Marcus Clark:

They’re kind of here with us. But, when I sit in this room and someone comes in here and it’s their first day, or they’re thinking about trying to check in, and I talk to them and we have this heart to heart conversation like we’re having with you guys; and this look and the tears come out because it’s the first time that they saw that someone understood. That relief, that little bit, just I mean, it’s not… It’s this. But that little bit of relief is the most relief they’ve felt in a long time, honestly, right? Not externally, because they might look like externally… A lot of guys come in here, or a lot of people come in here, and they look pretty put together. But me and Estil look them in the eyes and we’re like, “There’s something wrong in here that’s going on with you.”

Marcus Clark:

And we do a lot of talking about in here because that’s where it lies, right? When they come here and they do all the EMDR and they do the trauma work, and they do the family systems and they really look at their life as a whole and then, they look at not just the things externally. Things external are important, right? But when I only look at things external, I’m not looking at me. But then, when I take these external things and I place myself where I belong in them, and now, I’m able to see where I play a role in all of these external things that have been happening in my life. And when I saw that, the first time that I saw the role that I played in all of the things that happened to me, and the way that I’m carrying on those things in my life and how those things make me feel a certain type of way; it changed my world.

Marcus Clark:

It changed the… And when he talks about vacations and traveling the world, I’d go on vacations with family before and I felt one tenth of what everybody else felt. Literally, one tenth. And I can only say that now in retrospect, going on vacations and feeling it fully, that I was only feeling one tenth. At the time, I didn’t know that, right? But I look back in retrospect at the way that I felt and the way that I lived my life, and see successes and doing [inaudible 00:52:01] that ended out completely homeless with absolutely nothing or no one in my life. And how I feel today through this process that you see on the screen, there is nothing… It’s the dude that I am, the person that I am today is day and night different than the person that I was nine, almost 10 years, ago.

Marcus Clark:

You wouldn’t recognize… I mean, you might recognize me. I didn’t age that much. I still look kind of good.

Estil Wallace:

But you’re still black.

Marcus Clark:

Yeah, I’m still black. I was black then. What if I wasn’t black then? That’d be weird.

Estil Wallace:

That’d be super weird. Full 180.

Marcus Clark:

Full 180.

Estil Wallace:

Used to Mexican, now you’re not.

Marcus Clark:

Now I’m not. But, when I look back at the way I feel and I look back at the way that the people get the opportunity to experience what we’ve experienced, and go through the transformation that we’ve gone through; when I look back at those people it’s amazing to see what can happen through just being able to relate. The first thing, it’s the first thing that has to happen. The first thing we do is relate. And from relating, everything from that point forward is built upon that. The connection, the connection with people, the connection with the world, the connection with my friends. And I am no longer the things that I do.

Marcus Clark:

For a long time in my life I played football. I ran track. I was the things that I do. And I am no longer the things that I do. Things that I do are a part of who I am because that’s my personality and that’s what I love. But they are not my soul happiness. I’m happy regardless if I’m working out or not. I’m happy if I’m calling my friends when I’m sitting at home. I’m happy if I’m watching TV. I’m happy if I’m talking to my significant other. I’ve learned, and I wake up in the morning and I have true joy to be alive.

Marcus Clark:

And to me, there is nothing more beautiful than that. To be able to wake up and have joy in my heart. And I want all the people that suffer from what I suffered for, people who don’t, especially in this culture of isolation right now where people are sitting at home and mental health is going through the roof. And people feel disconnected from their fellows, and they just want to get out of the house to do anything to have some type of freedom. Now, imagine that feeling that we have in the pandemic when you feel isolated and alone, and you feel like you can’t connect. Now, imagine having that all the time no matter what.

Marcus Clark:

That’s how I felt. And now, in the pandemic, I’m fine. I’m great. I’m like, “Man this sucks for… I get it. It’s not that great, and I don’t want to be alone. But, I’m a lot better than I have ever been.” And through this, and that’s when he talks about through a pandemic when the relapse rate is climbing through the roof, I’m okay. And I’m here, and I’m present, and I’m able to be of help to those who are suffering. And Estil’s here, and he’s able to be a help to those that are suffering. And Cornerstone’s here, and we get to be of help to those who are suffering.

Marcus Clark:

And now, you’re here, and you get to be of help to those who are suffering. That’s the beauty of all of this, is that together we can help people through some of the worst time of their lives just to see a little bit of light. And the light singular is not as bright as the light collectively. All of our light together will shine brighter than any of our lights alone. So, it’s really cool to get to share this experience, man.

Marcus Clark:

I hope you guys got something from this presentation. I’m really grateful that you were willing to jump on and be a part of this with us.

Estil Wallace:

Me too.

Marcus Clark:

So, if you have any… I think she’s going to do the announcement out, and then if there’s any questions.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much.

Marcus Clark Escaping Rock Bottom 1

Marcus Clark Escaping Rock

Marcus Clark, Escaping Rock Bottom Podcast https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8fuKZ98shM From Homeless Drug User to Saving Lives As COO Of A Valley Recovery

To Hell & Back 2

To Hell & Back

To Hell & Back https://youtu.be/CJCqphEYqec Marcus Clark:Yeah, hello.Speaker 2:Hi.Estil Wallace:Good evening, hello. So, my name is Estil, I'm CEO and

ego

The Role of Ego

The Role of Ego in Addiction By Estil Wallace You’ve probably heard it said before: addiction is a disease that

From Teen Addict To Founder Of Treatment Center 3

From Teen Addict To

From Teen Addict To Founder Of Treatment Center https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyUo-oCyuPs&t=1s Speaker 1:This podcast is sponsored by Cornerstone Healing Center, where they

man running

Life After Rehab

Life After Rehab By Estil Wallace Once you’ve taken the first steps on your path towards recovery from addiction, you’ll

budgeting for treatment

I Don’t Think I

I Don’t Think I Can Afford Treatment By Estil Wallace Even if you’ve acknowledged that you’re struggling with addiction, external

going to treatment

Should I Stay Or

Should I Stay Or Should I Go? By Estil Wallace There’s no one-size-fits-all approach to recovery. For some, moving to

supporting someone through cocaine psychosis

Cocaine Psychosis

Cocaine Psychosis By Estil Wallace While America's ongoing opiate crisis may be a hot topic in today's news, cocaine has

Battling Addiction During a Pandemic 5

Battling Addiction During a

Battling Addiction During a Pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07lsXkWmpz8 Elwood Porter II:There's a couple different industries that's pandemic proof and drugs is one

You Can Come Back From Relapse 8

You Can Come Back

You Can Come Back From Relapse By Cornerstone You’ve completed rehab and worked hard to regain sobriety. Everything is going

drug abuse and addiction statistics

Drug Abuse and Addiction

Drug Abuse and Addiction Statistics By Megan Krause Content Strategist, Developmental Editor, Editor, Writer, Managing Editor January 17th 2020 The

highly effective approach to long-term addiction recovery

Walking through fire. A

Walking through fire. A scary yet highly effective approach to long-term addiction recovery By Estil Wallace Founder of cornerstone Healing

Getting a DUI in Arizona

7 Things You Need

Getting a DUI in Arizona Sucks: 7 Crucial Things You Need to Do Now By Megan Krause Content Strategist, Developmental

What Is Detox, and Who Needs to Go?

What Is Detox, and

What Is Detox, and Who Needs to Go? By Megan Krause Content Strategist, Developmental Editor, Editor, Writer, Managing Editor September

5 things to help keep you sober

5 Things To Keep

5 Things To Keep in Your Sobriety Toolbox By Megan Krause Content Strategist, Developmental Editor, Editor, Writer, Managing Editor July

can drug and alcohol rehab help me

Can Drug And Alcohol

Can Drug and Alcohol Rehab Help Me? By Karen Kritzstein Clinical Lead at Cornerstone Healing Center https://youtu.be/SAXt4Cm_Q58 Share on facebook

Estil Wallace | Phoenix Arizona 13

Estil Wallace | Phoenix

Estil Wallace, CEO/FOUNDER | Cornerstone Healing Center By Estil Wallace CEO/Founder of Cornerstone Healing Center https://youtu.be/1EkM0Q5fCpg Share on facebook Share

What Is an AA Sponsor, and Why Do I Need One? 14

What Is an AA

What is an AA Sponsor, and Why do I need one? By Megan Krause Writer, Editor and Director of Content

What Alcohol Recovery Has Done For Me? 15

What Alcohol Recovery Has

What Alcohol Recovery has done for me By Karen Kritzstein Clinical Lead at Cornerstone Healing Center https://youtu.be/PImWczf-izU Share on facebook

What Do They Do For Alcoholics In Rehab? 16

What Do They Do

What do they do for Alcoholics in Rehab? By Estil Wallace CEO/Founder of Cornerstone Healing Center https://youtu.be/caNrhaqj5lI Share on facebook

The Impact of Addiction Treatment 17

The Impact of Addiction

The Impact of Addiction Treatment By Sharmyn Townsend Yoga Instructor at Cornerstone Healing Center https://youtu.be/4VwJB_xopnA Share on facebook Share on

What Are the Signs of Addiction? 18

What Are the Signs

What Are the Signs of Addiction? By Estil Wallace CEO/Founder of Cornerstone Healing Center Drug addiction is the inability to

How Can You Help Someone With an Addiction? 19

How Can You Help

How can you help someone with an Addiction? By Estil Wallace CEO/Founder of Cornerstone Healing Center Watching your loved struggle

What Are the First Steps in Addiction Treatment? 21

What Are the First

What Are the First Steps in Addiction Treatment? By Estil Wallace CEO/Founder of Cornerstone Healing Center At first, drinking or

How to Help an Alcoholic 22

How to Help an

How to Help an Alcoholic? By Estil Wallace CEO/Founder of Cornerstone Healing Center Do you have a family member or

How Long Is Addiction Treatment? 26

How Long Is Addiction

How Long Is Addiction Treatment? By Sead Hasic Admission Coordinator at Cornerstone Healing Center https://youtu.be/9NJWJJ_zeek Share on facebook Share on

How to Overcome Addiction 27

How to Overcome Addiction

How to Overcome Addiction? By Anna Luna Community Liason at Cornerstone Healing Center https://youtu.be/GELEuKatah8 Share on facebook Share on google

What Is a Rehab Center? 28

What Is a Rehab

What is a Rehab Center? By Estil Wallace CEO/Founder of Cornerstone Healing Center What crosses your mind when you hear

What makes a good drug rehab? 29

What makes a good

What makes a good drug rehab? By Marcus Clark Executive Director at Cornerstone Healing Center https://youtu.be/qA9lwEnEK8U Share on facebook Share

6 Ways to Treat Addiction 30

6 Ways to Treat

6 Ways to Treat Addiction By Estil Wallace CEO/Founder of Cornerstone Healing Center Addiction is a chronic disease that robs

'Don't Give Up': Chronic Relapsers Who (Finally) Achieved Long-Term Sobriety Give Words of Encouragement 32

'Don't Give Up': Chronic

Words of Wisdom From Chronic Relapsers Who Achieved Long-Term Sobriety By Megan Krause Content Strategist, Developmental Editor, Editor, Writer, Managing

The 5 Stages of Addiction: A Guide For Parents 33

The 5 Stages of

The 5 Stages of Addiction: A Guide For Parents By Megan Krause Content Strategist, Developmental Editor, Editor, Writer, Managing Editor

Why Should I Go To Sober Living After Treatment? 35

Why Should I Go

Why Should I Go To Sober Living After Treatment? By Estil Wallace CEO/Founder of Cornerstone Healing Center When making the

Yoga & Recovery 36

Yoga & Recovery

Yoga & Addiction Recovery By Estil Wallace CEO/Founder of Cornerstone Healing Center YogaThis quite literally saving my life. In addition